tl;dr: Why is Peace So Difficult? Part I

Disclaimer: My bias might flare up in the next couple of posts. Just FYI.  

One of the most controversial issues in the Israel-Palestine conflict is that of Israeli settlements. You’ve probably already heard of them and even know what they are: Israeli communities built in the West Bank and in East Jerusalem (there used to be settlements in Gaza as well, but Israel withdrew from the area in 2005). These settlements are illegal under international law–they disobey the Geneva Convention’s ruling that states cannot move their own civilians into occupied territory–and are one of the biggest blockades to the peace process. I’ll let Al Jazeera go ahead and explain why:

One great film on Israeli settlements and what it’s like to live under Israeli military law is 5 Broken Cameras.

The film was nominated for an Oscar (Best Documentary Feature) in 2013, and aired on POV in its 26th season. It’s cleverly structured around each of the filmmaker’s broken cameras, most of which are broken in clashes with the IDF (Israeli Defense Forces), and tells the story of his family, living on the edge of the newly created separation barrier in the village of Bil’in. 5 Broken Cameras is available to watch on Netflix.

If you think you don’t have time to watch one of the best films to feature the Israel-Palestine conflict, check out the following infographics. Vizualizing Palestine is an excellent resource, with some of the best crafted graphics I’ve seen on Palestine.

This one is a great infographic companion to 5 Broken Cameras, and details facts and figures discussed in the film:

5 Broken Cameras: Growing up with the Bil'in Resistance(Source)

Oh, and that wall we talked about? Yeah, also illegal:

Where Law Stands on the Wall(Source)

Other sources to check out include B’Tselem and Jewish Voice for Peace, both of which are Jewish nonprofits acting in solidarity with Palestinians. Stay tuned for info and film recommendations on the Palestinian’s right to return later today.

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